Front cover chemistry



Another year means only one thing, another chance for some epic chemistry doodles to deface the front of our favourite reading material. So far, the first few months of the year have certainly not disappointed.

The Royal Society of Chemistry has made a strong start to the year; in Chemical Society Reviews some smart art quite literally added to the chemical toolbox, whilst another elemental superhero smashed the main group of the periodic table in a focussed special edition from February. Over at Chem. Comm. I spotted a delightful entry using a stained glass window to demonstrate MOFs forming ‘holey glass’.

Across the sea at Wiley, Angewandte Chemie continues to stack up the comical pictures in their ever growing art gallery. Every week they put out not just one, but four front covers! Because as we all know a magazine obviously has four fronts, including the front front, the inside front, the back to front, the inside out and probably some others. Angewandte also produces a frontispiece, which serves as yet another cover for a featured article. A particularly forceful recent entry announced the latest episode in the benzene chemistry saga as the Cubane Awakens.

One of my favourite covers from the start of this year, however, is from Green Chemistry where it appears that a new set of emoticons have taken over. (more…)

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Hopefully, it hasn’t escaped your notice that our December issue had a feature about chocolate in it – one of our tastiest articles this year! As soon as we knew that article was going in the issue, we knew exactly what we wanted on the cover: chocolate, and lots of it. But we’re Chemistry World, not Cadbury World, so we had to shoehorn in some chemistry.

What better way than to make a molecule of theobromine (one of the key alkaloid compounds found in everyone’s favourite cocoa-bean-based confectionery) out of chocolate?

In extensive (and hunger-inducing) discussions among the team, we came down to a couple of options: make a model ourselves out of shop-bought chocs or get a pro to do it. So armed with £20 out of the magazine’s budget, I headed to the shops to try the first option. (more…)

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Guest post from Tom Branson

It’s that time of year again, when all things creepy come out to play. Witches, monsters and of course the grinning pumpkins will be out and about. The humble pumpkin has found itself increasingly popular with artists wishing to outdo each other with their carving skills, but pumpkins have also found a home amongst equally competitive chemists shaping their constructions.

If you’re beginning to think I’ve been hit with a confusion spell then never fear, I’m simply referring to the modest cucurbituril. This molecule gets its name from the term for the pumpkin family. There’s apparently a resemblance between the ribs of the pumpkin and the bonds of the macromolecule. But this similarity is nowhere better shown than in the Halloween themed cover of the latest edition of Chemical Science.

This cover brings us into the darkness of a pumpkin-scientist’s den, light spilling through carved features illuminating the creations within. Looming large on the desk is a ghastly pumpkin, smiling whilst xenon bats flitter in and out of its gaping mouth. The desk is also littered with smaller cucurbiturils and a structure half way through its transmogrification into a fully-fledged pumpkin-xenon-bat-exchanger-thing. On the left side stands an old cage and a bat confined within. A dusty spider’s web blocks the exit, which is also being guarded nearby by acryptophaneunwilling to release its hostage. (more…)

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Guest post from Tom Branson

Photographs rarely make an appearance on journal covers and for good reason. How exactly are we meant to capture on film a chemical reaction? Well, Catalysis Science and Technology stuck a wonderful example on the cover a recent edition of the journal. So what is their secret to taking a good photo of the goings-on inside a test tube? Well here’s the trick, you don’t.

(more…)

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Guest post from Tom Branson

The taste of sweet success! But what is that flavour exactly, chewing gum or bon bons? The latest Organic & Biomolecular Chemistry (OBC) issue comes covered with sugary carbohydrate goodness and fullerene balls. Not at first obvious partners but throw in some lectins and you’ve got a hit.

On the cover a gumball machine has been set up in the lab with a few of the tasty C60 balls spilling out across the bench. The test tubes arranged at the back signify that the green, blue, red and yellow balls are obviously full of artificial colourings to make them tempting, but these are not for human consumption. In fact they are meant for bacterial consumption.

The bacteria in question produce fucose binding proteins, carbohydrate receptors that can be targeted for therapeutic reasons. On the cover, a schematic has been left out on the lab bench showing the fullerenes modified with linkers and terminating in fucose units, which then have a multivalent effect binding to one or more of the proteins.

The work focuses on the inhibition of two fucose binding proteins with very different binding site geometries. (more…)

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Guest post from Tom Branson

The famous Lego bricks have invaded almost all walks of life. Not content to remain as just a construction-themed toy, Lego has branched out into theme parks, video games, board games, clothing lines and even a movie. Until recently, however, chemistry remained a relatively unbuilt area. This changed last year with the production of an all female Lego academics lab, which was met by Lego and science fans alike screaming ‘just take my money!’ The set featured an archaeologist, an astronomer and a chemist and was not only super fun but helped to promote women in science. The plastic academic trio shot to stardom with their Twitter account showcasing some of the finer moments of life in the lab. Now, Lego has finally found a place at the pinnacle of scientific achievement on the front cover of the latest issue of Chemical Science.

A Lego chemist on the cover is dashing back into the lab carrying a flask ready for her next experiment. She is already wearing her white coat, blue gloves and glasses showing that even minifigures are safety conscious. Like many lab users she has made good use of the wall space by drawing out her chemical reactions. Although, the lab does seem rather open to the elements with the sun, clouds and rain threatening to ruin or in fact perhaps aid the artificial photosynthesis project taking place.

Lego is an awesome tool for building miniature skyscrapers and racing cars. So why not use it to build miniature or, more realistically, gigantic chemical structures? I think the authors could have used a little more creativity with the Lego for this cover – surely it’s not that difficult to build their cobalt complex out of the little bricks? Excuse me at this point whilst I run up to the attic, dive into my childhood supply and attempt to create a chemical masterpiece…

…actually it is quite difficult after all! Lego may seem like a nice alternative to the old ball and stick modelling kit, but it is not quite so specialised just yet.

The research performed by the group of Erwin Reisner, from the University of Cambridge, tells of their latest work on the development of a cobalt catalyst for H2 evolution. The metal complex they created shows good stability when anchored onto a metal oxide surface and also enhanced activity compared to previously reported cobalt catalysts. For a closer look into how the catalyst was built step by step (or perhaps brick by brick) head over to Chemical Science.

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Guest post from Tom Branson

I have tried many different ways to make chemistry make visual sense. I have struggled to make the π orbitals overlap in a Diels-Alder reaction scheme. I have toiled away building cardboard proteins to model a complex. And I still draw little cartoon viruses at work today. We cannot see exactly what goes on when proteins bump into each other or when electrons are shared between atoms, but we can attempt to visualise these natural phenomena in the best way possible. Making this both easy to understand and scientifically accurate, however, is not a simple task.

Chemical reactions and molecular interactions can be displayed in countless different ways. On the front and inside front cover of this month’s Chemical Science are two such attempts to show what is really going on in the reaction flask. (more…)

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Guest post from Tom Branson

It’s a full moon and a cold night. You may be tucked up in bed safely away from the worries of the day, but the night holds its own horrors. On a recent cover of Angewandte Chemie that peaceful night’s sleep was very much in danger of disruption from a rather unpleasant source.

© Shutterstock

Good night, sleep tight

In this disturbing image a resting girl seems to be blissfully unaware of the impending danger she faces. Personally, I would be a little more wary about getting into a bed that had ’bed bug aggregation pheromone’ written on the side of it. But if that wasn’t enough to put you off, then the array of compounds littered across the sheets should surely do the trick. These chemicals are, of course, a mix of volatile components given off by bed bugs.

The cover art accompanies an article from Gerhard Gries, of Simon Fraser University. Gries told me that he wanted to create a creepy image showing a girl ambushed by these bugs that ’come out at night to feed on us humans.’  Delightful. The photo of the bugs was taken in Gries’ lab of their very own bed bug colony. Lead author Regine Gries looks after and feeds the bugs herself, yes literally feeds the bugs herself. Bed bugs favour human blood and there’s no better source than a brave researcher. (more…)

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Guest post from Tom Branson

Last month I took a look back at the journal covers from Chemical Science in 2014 and asked the authors why they made these startling images. To follow on from these enlightening insights, I delved a little deeper and sought to find an answer to the ultimate question, which is of course: what makes a good journal cover?

Scientific and public audiences

To answer this question you first have to decide who the target audience(s) are and what you want to show them. Most of the authors I spoke to agreed that the image should be accessible to the general public. Julia Weinstein from the University of Sheffield, UK, whose cover was out last March, expressed the difficulty in also keeping the specialists happy. An image needs to have ‘general importance (for general public), and some fine details which will be of interest to professionals. It is a virtually impossible task!’ she said. However, how many members of the general public ever actually see these masterpieces is a question for another time. (more…)

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Guest post from Tom Branson

It’s a new year and therefore a new set of exciting cover art awaits us. Last year gave us some great examples of artistic flair matched with clear science communication, as well as a good few covers that can be described as nothing but bizarre. Either way, they got my attention.

But why do authors want their work on a front cover and what does it actually mean to the scientists who designed them? Instead of surging ahead with my own opinions, I thought that this time I should get some answers from the creators themselves. Focusing on Chemical Science, I tracked down the corresponding authors responsible for some of the cover art during 2014 and asked them a few simple questions to gather a small insight into the minds of these artists.

Why would anyone want to create a cover image?

Well, what’s the point? My first thought was simply about extra exposure. And yes, the overwhelming response I received was about gaining extra attention, raising the visibility of their work and attracting more readers. Everybody seemed to agree on this fact. (more…)

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