Careers



What makes a news story ‘news’? How do journalists construct an article? What sort of cake do they have in the Royal Society of Chemistry restaurant? If any of these questions have occurred to you, then you might be the person we’re looking for.

Cheese scones. Released by Philippe Giabbanelli under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 Generic license (http://www.flickr.com/photos/jemsweb/13787548/)

Chemistry World has a paid internship available for eight weeks in the summer of 2014. In those two months, you’ll pitch and write news stories, interview scientists and public figures, edit and lay out our magazine and get involved with our podcasts. It’s ideal for someone with an enthusiasm for science writing and a background in the chemical sciences.

To make the most of your time with us, we’ll also pay for membership of the Association of British Science Writers (ABSW), and take you to the UK conference of science journalists at the Royal Society. (more…)

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Last week, the Science Council released a list of their ‘100 leading practising scientists’. Their aim in publishing the list was to ‘highlight a collective blind spot in the approach of government, media and public to science, which either tends to reference dead people or to regard only academics and researchers as scientists.’

The Science Council is an umbrella that brings together 41 learned societies or professional bodies, including the Institute of Physics, the Society of Biology and of course, the Royal Society of Chemistry. To arrive at their list, member organisations were invited to nominate individuals who ‘who are currently engaged with UK science that other scientists might look to for leadership in their sector or career’. They then convened a representative judging panel to knock it down to a round 100.

The Chemistry World team looked through the list and realised that it contained a number of familiar names (perhaps no surprise, as the Royal Society of Chemistry is one of the organisations called upon to nominate), so we thought we would highlight some of the Science Council’s top 100, explaining how and why they appeared in the pages of Chemistry World(more…)

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As we mentioned here before this week saw the very first Chemistry World Jobs Live event, held in the Royal Society of Chemistry’s London home, Burlington House. The queues outside and happy faces inside seem to suggest that it was a resounding success.

Over 250 people visited on the day to meet representatives from universities, recruitment agencies and industry. If meeting potential employers wasn’t enough, delegates could opt to have their CV spring cleaned by the Royal Society of Chemistry’s careers advisors, and explored alternative career routes by getting involved with the ‘meet the experts’ panel discussion. (more…)

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A chance to find your dream job?

More and more, we conduct our lives online. From shopping to socialising, there’s nary an activity that hasn’t been supplemented or supplanted by the electronic ether, and the internet is never far from our fingers.

Shortcuts through cyberspace make the world smaller, but some lament that this comes at the expense of conventional contact and communication, and in fact pushes us further apart.

Online job searching is perhaps one of the more innocuous, indeed welcome, invasions of life lived remotely. Most job hunts are likely to begin with offering up a few key strokes to a database and end with a fingers-crossed click to dispatch a payload of personal data. Your first encounter of the third kind with an alien employer will probably be a handshake on the day of your interview, should your digital demeanour persuade them to pause upon your CV. (more…)

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Guest post by Emily James

On Wednesday 30th October, I attended the CaSE debate, hosted at the Royal Society. David Willetts (minister for universities and science), Julian Huppert (MP for Cambridge) and the freshly-appointed Liam Byrne (shadow minister for universities, science and skills) sat in good position to debate the future direction of science and engineering in the UK. The BBC’s Pallab Ghosh led the discussion, with pre-selected questions from the audience.

David Willetts, Liam Byrne & Julian Huppert at the CaSE debate (C) The Royal Society/Big T images

I couldn’t help but notice that despite the name of the event, there was a slight lack of hearty debate. My own desires for things to get a bit heated were met with held tongues – I blame the run up to the 2015 general election. However, perhaps consensus is not such a bad thing if you consider the cross-party agreements made on policies that act favourably on STEM education and industry. (more…)

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Have you ever wondered what it’d be like to come and work for us here at Chemistry World towers? If the thought has ever crossed your mind (or not, it doesn’t offend us if it hasn’t!) this could be your lucky day. We are currently advertising a couple of vacancies not to be missed. Whether you are new to the field of science communication, want to test whether this is the right career for you or you are an experienced journalist we’ve got something for everyone… Read on.

Business editor: We’re looking for an exceptional journalist, familiar with the chemical and pharmaceutical industry, to temporarily manage the business news section and regular business features.

For more info and to apply click here.

Science writer internship: The RSC is looking for a student member to work as a science writer in our editorial office this summer. You will gain experience working for two of our publications: Chemistry World and Education in Chemistry. This eight week position is supported by the Marriott Bequest Trust and will provide a hands-on introduction to the complete editorial process.

For more info and to apply click here. I recommend you also read Patrick’s blog here.

We’re looking for bright, ambitious people who are passionate about Chemistry World and communicating science. If that’s you, get in touch. Follow the links or, if you need more information, contact us at chemistryworld@rsc.org.

Bibiana Campos Seijo

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It’s that time of year again, when the mad March hares are making an appearance, daffodils popping up and the world seems to be waking from its long slumber. It’s spring, and this means that the Royal Society of Chemistry’s magazines Chemistry World and Education in Chemistry are looking for their next (paid!) intern to come and work with us. It’s a great opportunity to see how the magazines process works and take part in all stages of the production process.

The eight week position is supported by the Marriott Bequest, which pays out a stipend of £1750 to make sure you don’t starve! Unsurprisingly, we’re looking for someone with a proven interest in science and science journalism. The candidate will probably be part way through a chemical science degree or postgrad course too. If you think that sounds like you then take a look at the job posting and send us your CV and some examples of your writing.

Previous interns have found the experience very handy and it has helped them to move into other interesting and varied jobs. Our 2010 intern, Akshat Rathi, went on to intern at the Economist, who he still writes for, and now works in the communications department of the RSC. Josh Howgego still writes for Chemistry World and Education in Chemistry and is currently on an MSci course in science communication at Imperial College, after a brief work experience stint at the Times Higher Education. And last year’s intern, Ian Le Guillou, is currently doing some work experience at the BBC as a researcher on Dara O’Briain’s Science Club before he takes up a full time science writer job at Understanding Animal Research.

It really is a once in a lifetime opportunity! We are looking forward to hearing from you.

Patrick Walter

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My mugshot, for those who want to put a face to the name

In response to SeeArrOh’s ChemCoach carnival call, here is an insight into my small part as a cog in the inner workings of Chemistry World towers.

Your current job
I am one of two staff Science Correspondents for Chemistry World magazine. I am responsible for writing news and feature articles covering the whole range of chemistry research, industry, policy etc. I also edit two of our regular columns – Classic kit from the excellent Andrea Sella, and Totally synthetic, written by Paul Docherty (who some of you may know was once my lab- and flat-mate. It’s great when you can keep in touch with friends through your daily work.)

What you do in a standard “work day”
Like Carmen and a lot of others have mentioned, the nature of my role is very fluid. I can be writing and researching articles on anything from Rydberg atoms to Nobel prizes from one day to the next. That means I get to meet and speak to all sorts of interesting people, from the top researchers and industrialists around the world, to politicians and policymakers.

My usual day is spent hunting for news stories in journals and other sources (I read way more journals now than I ever did as a student), before our daily news meeting where we decide what we’re going to cover from what’s been found that day. Then I’ll be writing, researching or editing my latest pieces.

(more…)

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cw

We are looking for a student member to work with us this summer, gaining experience as a science journalist on both Chemistry World and Education in Chemistry - fancy giving it a go? The selected candidate will experience the complete editorial process from picking what news to report, through writing and editing, right up to final web and print publication. A once in a life-time opportunity (although as I work on Chemistry World my opinion is more than a little biased!).

This eight week position is supported by the Marriott Bequest Trust – with a bursary of £1750. We ask that applicants have an interest in science communication, demonstrate an enthusiasm for writing and are also (probably) coming towards the end of your chemical science undergraduate degree or postgraduate course. If this sounds like you, visit the RSC recruitment pages to find out more.

Looking forward to hearing from you!

PS: The deadline is 18 May, so get a wriggle on

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We at RSC Publishing have an opening in our Informatics R&D team for a suitably-qualified person to help revolutionize chemistry publishing. If you have chemoinformatics, computational chemistry or drug discovery expertise and you want to apply your talents to a new and completely different field, this is the job for you. Read more about the job here.

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