AAAS 2011



Sunday for me is Frontiers in Chemistry day, with two symposia as well as a topical lecture from the ever popular George Whitesides. Although I’m a bit spoilt for choice just like yesterday when I missed some molecular gastronomy from the White House chef as part of a session on the perception of taste. With so much choice it’s always difficult to pick what you’re going to have (at least for me), but my menu choices today were pretty tasty. (more…)

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I didn’t expect to have a conversation about J K Rowling today, but somehow that’s in part what I ended up discussing with Lawrence Principe after his lecture on alchemy this afternoon. Apparently, if you want an accurate history of Nicolas Flamel and don’t get distracted by the witchcraft and wizardry, Rowling’s account in Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s stone is one of the best. (more…)

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Would you use a shampoo that told you it was made from waste? What about cooking in a kitchen made from biomass? Today James Clark reminded us that, despite the chemical industry being the 3rd least popular industry after nuclear power and the tobacco firms, we can’t do without it. More importantly for Clark, who runs the Green Chemistry Centre of Excellence the traditional source of feedstock chemicals (oil) isn’t going to be around forever, so what are we going to do? How about the ultimate recycling? (more…)

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The meeting's program

Science without borders

American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) President Alice Huang opened the AAAS annual meeting meeting in Washington this afternoon (US time) with the President’s address, in which she discussed her 4 main interests: viruses, international science collaboration, equal opportunities and science education for all.

Huang is a Chinese born virologist who grew up in the US, went through the US education system and became a full professor at Harvard Medical School in 1971, so you can see why she might be passionate about these areas. At a press preview earlier in the day Huang spoke quite a lot about inequalities and discrimination in American science. (more…)

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