Nina Notman


Germany’s highest court stated on Tuesday that thousands of professors in the country are being short changed, and ruled that their pay must be raised by the end of the year.

But how much should a professor be earning? The chemistry professor at the University of Marburg who filed the lawsuit earns a basic salary of approximately €3900 (£3240) per month – a sum that he and the court agree is inadequate compared with what other civil servants earn.

But is nearly £40,000 per year really too little? How does this compare with pay for professors where you are?

Nina Notman

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Have a listen to this month’s Chemistry World podcast to hear Andrew, Anna and Phillip talking about the role of cement chemistry in the BP oil spill, the secret to oyster’s stickiness, and lots more.

We also discuss the current research into artificial blood with the University of Essex’s Chris Cooper, and interview Cole DeForest, from the University of Colorado, about using click chemistry for biological applications.

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In this week’s Chemistry in its element podcast, writer Hayley Birch shines a light on to the chemistry and medical uses of cholesterol

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Welcome to a new series of the Chemistry in its element podcasts, where we bring you the tales of discovery and experimentation behind our chemical compounds. And what better compound to start with than the one that brings us life: water

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In this week’s Chemistry in its element podcast, UCLA scientist and author Eric Scerri discusses lawrencium – an element that doesn’t seem to know its place in the periodic table.

This podcast is the last in this series of Chemistry in its element: we now have a complete periodic table of podcasts (until someone makes a new element of course!).

But if you are worried you’ll miss your weekly Chemistry World podcast fix don’t fear, we’re back next week with a whole new series looking into the exciting and complex world of chemical compounds.

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13 September 2010: Have something to say about an article you’ve read on Chemistry World this week? Leave your comments below…

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In this week’s Chemistry in its element podcast, Anna Lewcock takes us back in time to resolve hassium’s identity crisis

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This week’s Chemistry in its element podcast features UCLA’s Eric Scerri with the law abiding chemistry of bohrium

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In this week’s Chemistry in its element podcast, Cambridge University’s Peter Wothers shares with us his love for caesium

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In this week’s Chemistry in its element podcast, UCLA’s Eric Scerri introduces berkelium and explains how when first made it tested the chemical knowledge of postal services worldwide

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