Guest post by Andy Extance

In 1935, two scientists working at Princeton University in the US made a prediction that chemists and physicists are still striving to make a reality. Writing in the Journal of Chemical Physics, Eugene Wigner and Hillard Bell Huntington foresaw a strange-sounding form of hydrogen. Rather than its familiar molecular form, H2, with two atoms joined by a covalent bond, at high pressures hydrogen might switch to a metallic lattice of individual atoms.

Eugene Paul Wigner

Eugene Wigner

In researching my feature on high-pressure chemistry for the August issue of Chemistry World, this prediction came up regularly. Natalia Dubrovinskaia from the University of Bayreuth, Germany called it a point of honour, ‘like Fermat’s Last Theorem was for mathematicians’. That’s in part because, on top of the original predictions, later calculations suggested that metallic hydrogen should become a superconductor with relatively little cooling.

Today, research finally seems to be nearing this long-elusive goal. Yet while Wigner and Huntington are regularly cited in this work, their prediction doesn’t get the respect it deserves. Or at least that’s what Artem R. Oganov, from Stony Brook University in New York, US, and the Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology in Moscow, Russia, felt.  Oganov discussed the magnitude of the 1935 metallic hydrogen achievement with me in detail during our interview for my feature. He told the story so well, it deserves to be shared – and so we’re sharing it here. Oganov starts by explaining how great an achievement their paper was.   (more…)

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What should we name the new elements? Chris Chapman, Chemistry World‘s comment editor, puts forward the case for his favourite…

The news that we have four new elements is, obviously, buttock-clenchingly exciting for chemistry name nerds. The four new confirmed elements – 113, 115, 117 and 118 – will now have a proper name instead of the tongue-twisting ununpentium and the like. This can be proposed by the discoverers, although the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (Iupac) will get the final say. According to its latest rules, currently out for consultation, the elements can be named after a mythological concept or character; a mineral; a place; a property of the element; or a scientist. The endings of the elements are already decided: 113 and 115 will end in ‘ium’, 117 ‘ine’, and 118 ‘on’.

© Everett Collection/REX Shutterstock

Captain America – © Everett Collection/REX Shutterstock

So here’s a suggestion to the Japanese Riken group (discoverers for 113) or the Russian-American collaboration who discovered 115. How about vibranium?

Vibranium, as any comic book nerd knows, is a key element that comprises Captain America’s shield, and gives the irritatingly squeaky clean hero a way to dink bullets away, or a handy Frisbee to take out some bothersome villains. It’s also the element that Tony Stark ‘invents’ in the abysmal Iron Man 2 to end his crippling palladium dependency. Bizarrely, in the movie in turns out the element’s structure was hidden by his father (John Slattery, playing exactly the same character as he did in Mad Men) in a diorama of a 1974 business expo. Tony proceeds to go on a drinking binge, hurl abuse at Don Cheadle and miraculously create the element at his Malibu pad with little more than his raw genius. (more…)

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22 April 2012: Have something to say about an article you’ve read on Chemistry World this week? Leave your comments below…

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20 November 2011: Have something to say about an article you’ve read on Chemistry World this week? Leave your comments below…

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30 October 2011: Have something to say about an article you’ve read on Chemistry World this week? Leave your comments below…

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23 October 2011: Have something to say about an article you’ve read on Chemistry World this week? Leave your comments below…

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15 August 2011: Have something to say about an article you’ve read on Chemistry World this week? Leave your comments below…

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Akshat Rathi finds relief with one of the first clinically useful anaesthetics in this week’s Chemistry in its element podcast

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25 July 2011: Have something to say about an article you’ve read on Chemistry World this week? Leave your comments below…

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18 July 2011: Have something to say about an article you’ve read on Chemistry World this week? Leave your comments below…

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