March 2015



Guest post by Heather Cassell

Throughout my time in the lab I have greatly appreciated having post docs, PhD students and technicians looking after me. So I try to be as supportive as I can to the students in the lab, especially the undergraduates. This mainly involves answering lab based questions, such as: ‘Do you know where this reagent is?’ ‘How do I get rid of this waste?’  Or ‘this is broken, what should I do?’ The questions are usually straightforward, and I’ll do my utmost best to help (unless I’m in the middle of setting up a big experiment – some people just don’t understand that setting up 64 well plates takes concentration!)

iStock

But sometimes the questions are more philosophical, asking if I enjoy working in science, or what the value of postgraduate studies such as a masters or PhD can be. The answer to the first question can vary from ‘yes, science is amazing’ to ‘no, run away whilst you can, science is awful, it has no future or jobs’, depending on how things are going in my project, how much paperwork I have to do, and how many meetings I have to attend. (more…)

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Guest post by Rowena Fletcher-Wood

It was the 1990s, and drug giant Pfizer was on the trail of an elusive angina medication to relieve constricted blood vessels and lower blood pressure. Pharmaceutical chemists in Sandwich, UK, were focusing their efforts on drugs that release NO (nitric oxide), a highly reactive radical that expands blood vessels and releases physical tension. One promising candidate was sildenafil, which was trialled in Morriston Hospital, Swansea.

It’s always difficult to recruit volunteers for a drug trial: even the best trials in animals, computer simulations and in vitro can’t take into account the full complexity of the human body, it’s strikingly unobvious differences from the rat and the complex interconnectedness of its mechanisms. Unexpected things happen, some of them bad, and some of them beneficial.

Sildenafil, later renamed Viagra for marketing, seemed to be a no-go for angina relief, and the trials were unsuccessful. Pfizer recalled the drug, and an unexpected thing happened: the volunteers resisted. ‘[P]eople didn’t want to give the medication back’, said Pfizer’s Brian Klee, ‘because of the side effect of having erections that were harder, firmer and lasted longer.’ (more…)

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Guest post by JessTheChemist

‘In order to avert such shameful occurrences for all future time, I decree with this day the foundation of a German national prize for art and science. Acceptance of the Nobel prize is herewith forbidden to all Germans for all future time. Executive orders will be issued by the Reich minister for popular enlightenment and propaganda.’ – Adolf Hitler, 1937

Portrait of Richard Kuhn
By ETH Zürich (ETH-Bibliothek Zürich, Bildarchiv) CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Since my February blog post on Carl Djerassi, I have been wondering more and more about all the chemists out there who may have deserved a Nobel prize in chemistry but perhaps died before they could be awarded one or who were prevented from winning a medal for reasons out of their control.

It is well known that the second world war led to huge advancements in chemistry, with, for example, the first organophosphate compounds developed. These were initially used as deadly chemical weapons but have since changed the world through their use as pesticides. While many German scientists were advancing their field, two were forced to decline their Nobel prize in chemistry due to threats of violence and a decree by Adolf Hitler. These talented chemists were Adolf Butenandt from Austria and Richard Kuhn from Germany. (more…)

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Guest post from Tom Branson

It’s a full moon and a cold night. You may be tucked up in bed safely away from the worries of the day, but the night holds its own horrors. On a recent cover of Angewandte Chemie that peaceful night’s sleep was very much in danger of disruption from a rather unpleasant source.

© Shutterstock

Good night, sleep tight

In this disturbing image a resting girl seems to be blissfully unaware of the impending danger she faces. Personally, I would be a little more wary about getting into a bed that had ’bed bug aggregation pheromone’ written on the side of it. But if that wasn’t enough to put you off, then the array of compounds littered across the sheets should surely do the trick. These chemicals are, of course, a mix of volatile components given off by bed bugs.

The cover art accompanies an article from Gerhard Gries, of Simon Fraser University. Gries told me that he wanted to create a creepy image showing a girl ambushed by these bugs that ’come out at night to feed on us humans.’  Delightful. The photo of the bugs was taken in Gries’ lab of their very own bed bug colony. Lead author Regine Gries looks after and feeds the bugs herself, yes literally feeds the bugs herself. Bed bugs favour human blood and there’s no better source than a brave researcher. (more…)

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Guest post from Holly Salisbury, Royal Society of Chemistry

We challenged early career researchers to explain the importance of chemistry to human health in just 1 minute. The shortlisted videos are now online and we want YOU to pick your favourite entry.

The chemical sciences will be fundamental in helping us meet the healthcare challenges of the future, and we are committed to ensuring that they contribute to their full potential. As part of our work in this area, we invited undergraduate and PhD students, post-docs and early career researchers to produce an original video that demonstrates the importance of chemistry in health.

We were looking for imaginative ways of showcasing how chemistry helps us address healthcare challenges and entries could be no more than 1 minute long.

The winner will receive a £500 cash prize, with a £250 prize for second place and £150 prize for third place up for grabs too.

We want you to get involved: watch our 6 shortlisted videos and vote for your favourite before 11.59pm (GMT) 17 April 2015! (more…)

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