The Royal Society of Chemistry’s 3rd Younger Members Symposium (YMS2014) was held towards the end of June at the University of Birmingham. Kicking off the day was Lesley Yellowlees who gave an inspirational plenary lecture covering her research and career path, in one of her final acts as RSC president. ‘Aspire to be the president of the Royal Society of Chemistry – it’s the best job ever,’ she told the audience. She also shared lessons she had learned over the years including: develop your own style, grasp opportunities and find ways of dealing with difficult colleagues.

Jamie Gallagher, the University of Glasgow’s public engagement officer, energised everyone after lunch by talking about his work and why public engagement makes you a better academic. Public engagement doesn’t necessarily have to involve standing on a stage like Jamie does on a regular basis. He gave some fantastic advice on the many schemes and organisations to get involved with such as Cafe Scientifique and your local RSC section.

Both excellent talks but the real meat of the day was comprised of poster sessions and seminars where attendees shared and quizzed each other on their research. Chemistry World was delighted to sponsor its first ever poster prizes in the inorganic and materials category. And the winners were…

First prize went to Giulia Bignami from the University of St Andrews.

Giulia Bignami: ‘The research work described in my poster focuses on the synthesis, according to the assembly-disassembly-organisation-reassembly (ADOR) method, of 17O-enriched UTL-derived zeolitic frameworks and their subsequent characterisation through 17O and 29Si solid-state NMR, involving both 1D and 2D spectral techniques, in magnetic fields ranging from 9.4T to 20.0T. We showed how 17O and 29Si NMR-based structural investigation proves extremely helpful to gain insights into the synthetic process employed, thus shedding light on the way new and targeted zeolitic structures could be achieved.’

Second prize went to Gurpreet Singh from the University of Central Lancashire.

Gurpreet Singh: ‘The aim of the research is to find new ion exchange materials for use in the nuclear industry. The problem with some of the current ion-exchange materials is that they are not stable to the conditions found in the waste pools at nuclear sites. Zirconium phosphates have been proposed to be more stable and by doping other metals into the structure in place of zirconium it might be possible to create new materials which have increase selectivity for the cations of interest (strontium and caesium). The work presented shows that yttrium can be successfully introduced into the structure of alpha-zirconium phosphate and the ion-exchange experiments are on-going.’

Third prize went to Daniel Lester for a poster about work he did at the University of Sussex.

Daniel Lester: ‘In the field of VOC (volatile organic compound) degradation by photocatalysis, P25 (powdered TiO2 of 75% anatase 25% rutile composition) is often seen as a benchmark material. However, in the continuous flow reactors used in industry, a powdered catalyst is impractical to use. I therefore aimed to create several supports for TiO2, which not only improved the physical durability of the catalyst but also improved the photocatalytic efficiency. Glass wool acted as a wave guide, TiO2 nanofibres served as photoactive supports and zeolites provided an electron sink to decrease hole-pair recombination and to increase contact time between the active species (TiO2) and the target VOC.’

Congratulations to all of our poster winners and to the organisers for an enjoyable symposium.

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