December 2012



These opportunities don’t come around very often but at Chemistry World we currently have an opening for a Multimedia and online editor. We are looking for someone who will take responsibility for Chemistry World‘s multimedia offering (video and audio inc. podcasts and webinars) acting both as editor and producer of multimedia web content, from conception through filming/recording to editing and posting as well as assisting in the development of existing and new multimedia products.    

You will be a talented science communicator who will take responsibility for conceiving, scripting, producing and coordinating the publication of multimedia content onto the website to ensure Chemistry World‘s online presence remains optimal. The role will involve liaising with the Commercial Sales team to identify commercial opportunities within Chemistry World‘s online/multimedia offering as well as the Magazines platform development team to ensure functionality and design of the site remain up to date and innovative, meeting the needs of the readership. 

You will need to demonstrate excellent communication skills as you will represent the RSC at a variety of scientific conferences and events. Networking skills will also be a requirement to this position.  

You can find more info and apply here.

Bibiana Campos Seijo

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We told you about this last Christmas but a year is a long time so let me remind you again: if you get a tablet device for Christmas, one of the first apps you need to install is the Chemistry World app.

The digital edition of Chemistry World is available from Google Play and iTunes and is free to download for all RSC members and e-members. You can log in, choose the latest issue or a back issue or and swipe through it just like the printed publication. And don’t forget you can download the issue for offline reading at a time that is convenient for you. So get downloading!

Also please do let us know what you think. Any feedback to chemistryworld@rsc.org would be most welcome.

And if you are not yet an RSC member or e-member you can now join via the Chemistry World website at www.chemistryworld.org or on the RSC website at www.rsc.org/membership.

Bibiana Campos Seijo

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And here we are at the end. The answers to yesterday’s quiz are as follows:

275 molecules of water is the minimum number needed to form an ice crystal or the world’s smallest snowflake. You can read our story here.

Eating a big turkey Christmas lunch is reputed to make you feel sleepy, but this is a myth. The levels of tryptophan in turkey are comparable to other meats.

We hope you’ve enjoyed the quiz. Thanks to all for your answers.

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It was the secret vampire-killing weapon in the movie Blade, and it’s responsible for all those undergraduate titrations. Find out about the chemistry of super-chelating ligand EDTA in this week’s Chemistry in its element

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Drum roll please! It’s the twelfth (and final) day of our topical Christmas quiz. On with the show!

In September, we learnt what the minimum number of water molecules needed to form an ice crystal was… How many was it?

Which amino acid reputedly found in high concentrations in turkey is supposedly what makes you feel like having a nap after your Christmas dinner?

(more…)

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On the eleventh day of Christmas, Chemistry World brought to you, the penultimate day of the quiz. And straight in with the first question.

In January, we found out that the caffeine levels in espresso coffees purchased from many coffee shops are well above the recommended daily allowance for pregnant women set by the Food Standards Agency in the UK. What’s is this recommended daily allowance for pregnant women?

Which explosive compound would you find in small amounts in your Christmas cracker?  (more…)

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You know that smell after a rainstorm? It’s actually a compound called geosmin. Find out more in this week’s Chemistry in its element

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The leaping lads clearly have a surfeit of Christmas spirits!

And on the tenth day of Christmas we pushed on with the topical news quiz. Today’s questions to stretch your synapses to breaking point are:

Which research group made history in April by using a 3D printer to create their own personalised reaction vessels that actually influenced the course of the chemical reaction? 

This year chemist Pete Wothers is giving the Royal Institution Christmas Lecture, but who gave the first RI Christmas Lecture? For those who listen to the podcast. (more…)

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The aforementioned ladies

And on the ninth day of Christmas… my lawyers advised me against making sexist jokes pertaining to the dancing ladies in question. Today’s questions to stretch your memory and your chemical knowledge are:

Why was Chemistry World‘s mild-mannered Phillip Broadwith shouting at queen-of-jam-tarts-and-kindly-old-lady Mary Berry, who presents the programme The Great British Bake-off?

What was Nasa associate administrator John Grunsfeld referring to in August when he said: ‘The seven minutes of terror has turned into the seven minutes of triumph’?

And finally, the answers to yesterday’s quiz. It was the ozone layer that had grown slightly in size. Warmer temperatures have been blamed for the slight increase and the hole is not predicted to return to its 1980s state until 2065. An amazing 5 (five!) litres of carbon dioxide escape from every bottle of champagne. Have a look at our Christmassy feature, Raising a glass to champagne, to learn more. We’ll see you tomorrow at the same chem-time, at the same chem-place.

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Today’s topical Christmas chemistry quiz is brought to you by the number eight – in this case the number of women employing an outmoded and romanticised vision of the collection of a dairy product.

On with the show.

What was discovered to have grown slightly this year to 8.2 million square miles in size?

If you’re celebrating Christmas or New Year with champagne, how much carbon dioxide is released from a standard 750ml bottle?  (more…)

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