October 2006



Scientists have welcomed an economist’s review into the costs of climate change, which warns of global recession if greenhouse gas emissions are not stabilised.

A proper economic analysis was long overdue, providing independent support for the views of scientists accused of hyping up climate change, Dave Reay, National Environment Research Council (Nerc) research fellow at Edinburgh University, UK, told Chemistry World. ‘If this is the tipping point, I don’t mind if it comes from an economist,’ he said.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

A solid matrix could be used for controlled release of herbicides, say a team of workers from the UK.

Dermot O’Hare of the University of Oxford explained how layered double hydroxides (LDH) have been used to absorb chlorophenoxyacetic acids, a family of herbicides. These agents can be stored in the LDH matrix and released on demand, explained O’Hare.

The herbicide complexes are stored, or intercalated, in the LDH by an ion exchange mechanism. Layered double hydroxides are made up of positively charged layers with anions between the layers to balance the charge. The anions are replaced in the matrix in the ion exchange process.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

A molecule that can recognise carbohydrates could further the fight against infections.

The carbohydrate-containing compound lipid A is found in certain bacteria and can cause septic shock, a serious condition that may lead to organ failure and death. Ben Miller at the University of Rochester, New York, US, says molecules that selectively bind lipid A could be used to diagnose infection or to treat septic shock.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Ionic liquids could be the key to a commercial process for converting natural gas to methanol. Using remote reserves of natural gas, whose main component is methane, is currently a challenge. By converting the gas to a liquid, such as methanol, it becomes much easier to store and transport.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

European Union ministers are collaborating with the European Parliament to secure early restrictions on perfluorooctane sulfonates (PFOS), chlorinated compounds used in applications including surface coatings, photolithography, production of microchips, and certain hydraulic fluids.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Simple changes in farming methods could help reduce levels of acrylamide, the suspected carcinogen and possible neurotoxin, in wheat-based foods, according to UK researchers.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

UK scientists have re-shaped micrometre-sized emulsion droplets using light. Andrew Ward at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, UK, together with Colin Bain at Durham University, UK, and colleagues coaxed (normally spherical) emulsion droplets into a range of geometric shapes with optical tweezers, which use tightly focused laser light to manipulate microscopic objects. 

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

The radioactive element plutonium can travel through groundwater despite its low solubility: it hitches a ride on tiny colloid particles in the water.

Russian, American and French researchers have imaged plutonium clinging to mineral colloids around four kilometres away from a contaminated lake near a nuclear waste processing plant in Mayak, Russia. 

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Life began with a chemical reaction under the sea over four billion years ago. That is the claim of German scientist Gunter Wachtershauser, whose team has recreated a crucial part of the reaction, synthesising all the necessary ingredients for a living organism. All that was needed was volcanic gases, water and rock.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

The humble honeybee is giving up its genetic secrets, now that scientists have unveiled the insect’s entire genome sequence.

Although genomes seem to arrive with increasing regularity, the honeybee genome marks an important milestone in the effort to decode the DNA of animals and plants.

Honey bee

It is only the third insect genome to be sequenced, following the fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster) and the mosquito (Anopheles gambiae).It has prompted an unprecedented coordination of related publications, with NatureScienceGenome Research and the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA, all orchestrating publication of numerous studies linked to the announcement.

In fact, the honeybee (Apis mellifera) has occupied a central position in the field of genetics ever since Gregor Mendel switched allegiance from peas to bees. It wasn’t the most successful research project – his bees produced delicious honey, but were extraordinarily vicious and had to be destroyed. Yet, unwittingly, Mendel had opened the door on the fascinating field of bee behaviour

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Next Page »